Chicago, Friendship, Health Care Services, Nostalgia, Nursing

The Perks of Serving on the Board

  I have served on the Family Patient Advisory Council at my local hospital in Raleigh, North Carolina since it’s inception a little over two years ago. I became the first Chair and now I am the Senior Chair. This last week, the hospital funded my travel to Chicago to attend the Patient Experience Conference… Continue reading The Perks of Serving on the Board

Beryl Institute, Chicago, Duke Raleigh Hospital, Health Care Services, Hospital Board

Have you ever considered being on a Board?

I have choosen to reblog this post because I believe nurses bring invaluable skills and knowledge to various health care boards. I am currently serving on a board at Duke Raleigh Hospital in Raleigh, NC.
Next week I will be in Chicago at the Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference along with the Chief Nursing Officer, and the Manager of Service Excellence to give a presentation about our Patient Advocacy Council. I will post updates from the conference and share more information about my board experience on future Posts.

NurseManifest

Here at the NurseManifest project, we have tended to emphasize grass roots, “on the street” kinds of activism to bring our deepest nursing values into everyday experience.  But manifesting nursing values needs to happen everywhere, and one of the spheres whereconference-table this is vitally important is in the Board Rooms, large and small.  Lisa Sundean, who is one of our NurseManifest bloggers, is embarking on her dissertation project to explore nurses on Boards, and in the interest of sharing her work wide and far, she has established website and blog – SundeanRN.org!  Her first blog post is now available, explaining why this is vitally important!  I highly recommend that you read her post: What do Boards Have to do with Nursing?  And if you have never considered serving in this capacity, think about it now!  We need to be manifesting nursing everywhere – at the bedside, the chairside…

View original post 7 more words

Health Care Services, Memoir, Nursing, Nursing Stories, spinal cord injury, Telling Stories

A Broken Man Who is Hard to Forget

Richey rolled himself in a manual wheelchair into the exam room of the spinal cord clinic for the first time on a warm spring day in April. He managed to lift his quivering right arm to shake my hand. I was the new nurse practitioner in charge of his care. He had some ability to… Continue reading A Broken Man Who is Hard to Forget

Flight nurses, grief, Health Care Services, Independent nursing practice, Nursing

Nurses Save Lives

    What a pleasant surprise to read that nurses save lives (italics mine) in a news article yesterday, September 21. Unfortunately, the story was not a happy one. The Raleigh, NC News & Observer detailed the memorial service for the crew of a Duke Life Flight Air Ambulance that crashed on September 8 killing… Continue reading Nurses Save Lives

Health Care Services, Telling Stories

Getting on the Bus

This post appeared in two parts on September 8 & 20, 2013.   The first night in a hotel room in Estoril, Portugal, my heart, flipping about in my chest, jolted me awake. Thump. Thump. Thump. Silence. Then a rush of horses’ hooves clopped on my ribs. Trying to ignore my heart’s gymnastics, I tried… Continue reading Getting on the Bus

Doctors, Health Care Services, Memoir, Nursing, Nursing in the 60s, Nursing Stories

Don’t Question the Doctor

My friend Lois and I were talking on the phone the other day. We both graduated from diploma nursing schools in the early 60s. It was a time when the nurse was considered the “handmaiden” of the physician. We played the Doctor-Nurse Game* and even stood up when a doctor entered a room. Feeling powerless… Continue reading Don’t Question the Doctor

Health Care Services, Heart Valve Surgery, Nursing Stories, Open Heart Surgery, Valve Replacement

Cardiac Advances Versus Patient Benefit: A Moral Dilemma

My story, Closing the Door, recently published in Stories That Need to be Told: A Tulip Tree Anthology, tells of the emergence some fifty years ago of cardiac catheterization, artificial heart valves and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and how I, as a young nurse, had to make sense of the advancement of technology versus patient benefit. This… Continue reading Cardiac Advances Versus Patient Benefit: A Moral Dilemma