A Nurse Tells it Like it Is

A nurse has called attention to our dysfunctional health care system in the OP-ED section of the New York Times. (Our Jury-Rigged Health Care System by Teresa Brown, New York Times, September 6, 2019) Brown has hit a nerve as evidenced by the 969 comments to date supporting her stance. Her article discusses how nurses (and … Continue reading A Nurse Tells it Like it Is

NURSES DON’T WANT TO BE DOCTORS

For the life of me I don’t know why the New York Times published Sandeep Jauhar’s essay, “Nurses Are Not Doctors,” in the Opinion Pages on April 30, 2014. His essay argued that nurse practitioners shouldn’t practice independently. As a nurse practitioner it’s obvious that I wouldn’t agree with his opinion but his case was … Continue reading NURSES DON’T WANT TO BE DOCTORS

A Physician Finally Gets Nursing

I couldn't write better coverage about Dr. Arnold Relman's comments about nursing, so I'm reblogging this Post. The comments he made are both "good" and "bad." Good: Dr. Relman, physician and former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, stated "When nursing is not optimal, patient care is never good." Bad: Dr. Relman finally … Continue reading A Physician Finally Gets Nursing

Lois Roelofs posted this story of Martha Keochareon, a nurse dying of pancreatic cancer who selflessly allowed nursing students to be present during her last days at home in order to learn about hospice care.
I hope this poignant story moves you as much as it did me.

Write Along with Me

As she lay dying from pancreatic cancer, Nurse Martha Keochareon wanted to do more than plan her funeral. So she called her alma mater and offered to become a “case study” for nursing students. She reasoned she could help students learn about the dying process while, at the same time, it would be a way for her “to squeeze one more chapter out of life.”

I loved this story. First, as a retired nurse educator, I was struck by Nurse Keochareon’s selfless giving. I could identify with her desire to teach; as nurses we are taught, along with being caregivers, to be teachers (as well as communicators, researchers, leaders and more). I believe we consider it a duty and a privilege to empower our patients or students with the resources they need to function successfully in their lives.

Second, Nurse Keochareon had lived with pancreatic cancer for more than six…

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