Chicago, Home Health, Nursing Stories

The Murder Building

Originally posted on February 19, 2012   When I visited a patient in my caseload that lived in an “unsafe” part of the city, I went in the morning. Right after the pimps and drug dealers had called it a night and before the shop keepers pulled up the bars over the store windows and the… Continue reading The Murder Building

Geriatrics, Home Health, Nursing Stories

There Are Some Patients We Never Forget

This was first published on January 29, 2012.   When you have been a nurse as long as I have there are patients who take residence in your memories and resurface frequently. They could almost be family except they have a short history in your life. What they were like before or after you knew… Continue reading There Are Some Patients We Never Forget

Friendship, Home Health, Laughter, Memoir, Nursing, Nursing Stories, Writing the Book

Laughter: the measure of a friendship

I believe the better the friendship the more raucous the laugher—the real belly laughs that make you think you are going to die of asphyxiation. I have a number of friends that are enjoyable to be with but I have just two or three that make me really laugh. Donna and I worked in home… Continue reading Laughter: the measure of a friendship

Dreams, Independent nursing practice, Nursing, Nursing Stories

I HAD A DREAM

Revisiting the dreams.

Marianna Crane

Mercury Sphygmomanometer

In preparation for moving I discover the darndest things as I unpack dusty boxes stored in the attic untouched for years. This time it’s a mercury sphygmomanometer, packed in its original carton along with a “limited warranty” card that should have been filled out within ten days of purchase. Looks like I didn’t even open the box but put the blood pressure machine away for the day I would open my independent practice.

That would have been in the early 80s after I became a gerontological NP

and

after I worked in Chicago with inner city, underserved elderly

and

after I became frustrated with the lack of resources and left to become an administrator of an HMO

and

after I knew I didn’t want to be in administration

and

after going back to work as a nurse practitioner once again

and

after moving to three different states

and

after finally…

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AGING, Death & Dying

THE TIME IS RIGHT

Taking a Blog break. This post appeared on March 10, 2013.

Marianna Crane

A friend deliberated whether she should visit her father for his 95th birthday. She was swamped with commitments. Since he was unaware of his birthday as well of his surroundings and didn’t even recognize his three daughters, there was no urgency to travel to another state.

However, she cleared her schedule and made the trip, as did another sister and a niece. Both lived out-of-state also.

As it turned out, on his birthday, he had a choking episode with difficulty breathing. He stopped eating and died three days later, surrounded by those he loved who otherwise would not have been there had they not come to commemorate the day he was born.

This story reminded me of a patient I cared for back in the early ‘90’s when I worked as a nurse practitioner in a home care program. I had made a first visit to an elderly man…

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AGING, Memoir, Nursing Stories, Writing the Book

WHAT I LEARNED

  I am writing my memoir because of what I learned when I ran a clinic on the tenth floor of a Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) high-rise twenty years ago. All my patients were over sixty years of age. I was an inexperienced nurse practitioner and new to working with older people. I learned that… Continue reading WHAT I LEARNED

Home Health, Memoir, Nursing, Nursing Stories

THERE ARE SOME PATIENTS WE NEVER FORGET

01/29/2012 BY MARIANNA CRANE When you have been a nurse as long as I have there are patients who take residence in your memories and resurface frequently. They could almost be family except they have a short history in your life. What they were like before or after you knew them usually remains a mystery.… Continue reading THERE ARE SOME PATIENTS WE NEVER FORGET