The Building as Character

This was originally posted on November 5, 2018 by Kathy Pooler   Memoir Writer's Journey   November 5, 2018  By Kathy Pooler The Building as Character by Memoirist Marianna Crane   “Home is a shelter from storms—all sorts of storms.” —William J. Bennett     As a family nurse practitioner, I read Marianna Crane’s memoir … Continue reading The Building as Character

Countdown to Publication Date: One Week

I have three readings scheduled at local books stores in the next few weeks. I will send out an e-vite tomorrow. It's both a stressful and exciting time. I have to remind myself to "have fun." The latest review of my book: Chicago Writers Association, Windy City Reviews: Stories From The Tenth Floor Clinic. Marianna … Continue reading Countdown to Publication Date: One Week

COUNTDOWN TO PUBLICATION DATE: THREE WEEKS

This past week I promoted my book. Monday, after a class I attended on public speaking, I collared a woman who had also attended the lecture as she exited the ladies room. “How will you use the information?” I asked. She told me she had planned to start a class for widows on ways to … Continue reading COUNTDOWN TO PUBLICATION DATE: THREE WEEKS

Josephine Ensign (1960 – )

I am happy to see Josephine Ensign acknowledged by Nursemanifest. Ensign is an NP and her book, “Catching Homelessness,” tells not only about those without social supports but the role of the NP in helping those who fall through the cracks. The barriers we NPs face by the medical establishment is clearly documented in the story of her experience. She has also been helpful to me in developing my own nurse practitioner memoir.
Her book has been awarded the AJN 2017 Best Book of the Year in the Creative Works category. Congratulations, Josephine.

NurseManifest

Inspiration for Activism!

  •  Worked for three decades as a family nurse practitioner providing primary health care to homeless adolescents and adults in large urban areas on both coasts of the U.S.
  • Focuses her work on increasing understanding of the lives of marginalized populations, and developing ways to increase their access to effective health care programs.
  • Uses personal stories to highlight important public policy issues within an emancipatory framework.
  • Her essays have appeared in The Sun, The Oberlin Alumni Magazine, Pulse, Silk Road, The Intima, The Examined Life Journal, Johns Hopkins Public Health Magazine, and the nonfiction anthology “I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse“, edited by Lee Gutkind.  
  • Her first book “Catching Homelessness: A Nurses Story of Falling thought the Safety Net,” provides a piercing look at the homelessness industry, nursing, and our country’s health care safety…

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Patients Change Us: A Formative Nursing Experience — Off the Charts

From boliston, via Flickr Many years ago, I was given the greatest gift by a patient who had no idea he would change my life and define my professional outlook as a nurse. While not every nurse will be fortunate enough to have such an explicit experience of the effect of the care they provide… via … Continue reading Patients Change Us: A Formative Nursing Experience — Off the Charts

Keeping Creative Juices Juicy

A few years back I took an acrylic painting class. Sometimes, while the ever-present radio played a Mahler violin concerto, an aria from La Traviata or Johnny Cash’s Ring of Fire, I would spin about whipping color on my canvas, feeling “in the zone.” My mind would disconnect from my hand, which moved independent of … Continue reading Keeping Creative Juices Juicy

GUN CULTURE

I have written about gun control on December 16, 2012 and reblogged the post in December 14, 2013. Three years later, I’m rebloging it along with the editorial from the New York Times. I am committed to do as the NYT suggests: I will not vote for politicians who support gun laws that allow the people to “legally purchase weapons designed specifically to kill with brutal speed and efficiency.”
May we Americans who care about the future of our children and grandchildren deliver the message to our elected officials that we will no longer tolerate the NRA’s influence.

This editorial published on A1 in the Dec. 5 edition of The New York Times. It is the first time an editorial has appeared on the front page since 1920.

The Opinion Pages | EDITORIAL

End the Gun Epidemic in America

It is a moral outrage and national disgrace that civilians can legally purchase weapons designed to kill people with brutal speed and efficiency.
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD DEC. 4, 2015

All decent people feel sorrow and righteous fury about the latest slaughter of innocents, in California. Law enforcement and intelligence agencies are searching for motivations, including the vital question of how the murderers might have been connected to international terrorism. That is right and proper.
But motives do not matter to the dead in California, nor did they in Colorado, Oregon, South Carolina, Virginia, Connecticut and far too many other places. The attention and anger of Americans should also be directed at the elected leaders whose job is to keep us safe but who place a higher premium on the money and political power of an industry dedicated to profiting from the unfettered spread of ever more powerful firearms.

It is a moral outrage and a national disgrace that civilians can legally purchase weapons designed specifically to kill people with brutal speed and efficiency. These are weapons of war, barely modified and deliberately marketed as tools of macho vigilantism and even insurrection. America’s elected leaders offer prayers for gun victims and then, callously and without fear of consequence, reject the most basic restrictions on weapons of mass killing, as they did on Thursday. They distract us with arguments about the word terrorism. Let’s be clear: These spree killings are all, in their own ways, acts of terrorism.

Opponents of gun control are saying, as they do after every killing, that no law can unfailingly forestall a specific criminal. That is true. They are talking, many with sincerity, about the constitutional challenges to effective gun regulation. Those challenges exist. They point out that determined killers obtained weapons illegally in places like France, England and Norway that have strict gun laws. Yes, they did.
But at least those countries are trying. The United States is not. Worse, politicians abet would-be killers by creating gun markets for them, and voters allow those politicians to keep their jobs. It is past time to stop talking about halting the spread of firearms, and instead to reduce their number drastically — eliminating some large categories of weapons and ammunition.

It is not necessary to debate the peculiar wording of the Second Amendment. No right is unlimited and immune from reasonable regulation.

Certain kinds of weapons, like the slightly modified combat rifles used in California, and certain kinds of ammunition, must be outlawed for civilian ownership. It is possible to define those guns in a clear and effective way and, yes, it would require Americans who own those kinds of weapons to give them up for the good of their fellow citizens.
What better time than during a presidential election to show, at long last, that our nation has retained its sense of decency?

Marianna Crane

When we were traveling in Ireland this past October, our Irish tour guide told us that Ireland did not have a “gun culture” as we did in the States. Never having heard that opinion expressed before, the term “gun culture” stayed in my head.

After the recent killings at an elementary school in Connecticut, I looked up the word “culture” in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition, which reads in part: the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations; the characteristic features of everyday existence shared by people in a place or time.

Charles M. Blow wrote in A Tragedy of Silence, New York Times, that public opinion is shifting away from gun control. In a recent Gallup poll 53 percent to 43 percent opposed the ban on semiautomic guns or assault rifles.

As I watched…

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