GUN CULTURE

I have written about gun control on December 16, 2012 and reblogged the post in December 14, 2013. Three years later, I’m rebloging it along with the editorial from the New York Times. I am committed to do as the NYT suggests: I will not vote for politicians who support gun laws that allow the people to “legally purchase weapons designed specifically to kill with brutal speed and efficiency.”
May we Americans who care about the future of our children and grandchildren deliver the message to our elected officials that we will no longer tolerate the NRA’s influence.

This editorial published on A1 in the Dec. 5 edition of The New York Times. It is the first time an editorial has appeared on the front page since 1920.

The Opinion Pages | EDITORIAL

End the Gun Epidemic in America

It is a moral outrage and national disgrace that civilians can legally purchase weapons designed to kill people with brutal speed and efficiency.
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD DEC. 4, 2015

All decent people feel sorrow and righteous fury about the latest slaughter of innocents, in California. Law enforcement and intelligence agencies are searching for motivations, including the vital question of how the murderers might have been connected to international terrorism. That is right and proper.
But motives do not matter to the dead in California, nor did they in Colorado, Oregon, South Carolina, Virginia, Connecticut and far too many other places. The attention and anger of Americans should also be directed at the elected leaders whose job is to keep us safe but who place a higher premium on the money and political power of an industry dedicated to profiting from the unfettered spread of ever more powerful firearms.

It is a moral outrage and a national disgrace that civilians can legally purchase weapons designed specifically to kill people with brutal speed and efficiency. These are weapons of war, barely modified and deliberately marketed as tools of macho vigilantism and even insurrection. America’s elected leaders offer prayers for gun victims and then, callously and without fear of consequence, reject the most basic restrictions on weapons of mass killing, as they did on Thursday. They distract us with arguments about the word terrorism. Let’s be clear: These spree killings are all, in their own ways, acts of terrorism.

Opponents of gun control are saying, as they do after every killing, that no law can unfailingly forestall a specific criminal. That is true. They are talking, many with sincerity, about the constitutional challenges to effective gun regulation. Those challenges exist. They point out that determined killers obtained weapons illegally in places like France, England and Norway that have strict gun laws. Yes, they did.
But at least those countries are trying. The United States is not. Worse, politicians abet would-be killers by creating gun markets for them, and voters allow those politicians to keep their jobs. It is past time to stop talking about halting the spread of firearms, and instead to reduce their number drastically — eliminating some large categories of weapons and ammunition.

It is not necessary to debate the peculiar wording of the Second Amendment. No right is unlimited and immune from reasonable regulation.

Certain kinds of weapons, like the slightly modified combat rifles used in California, and certain kinds of ammunition, must be outlawed for civilian ownership. It is possible to define those guns in a clear and effective way and, yes, it would require Americans who own those kinds of weapons to give them up for the good of their fellow citizens.
What better time than during a presidential election to show, at long last, that our nation has retained its sense of decency?

Nursing Stories

When we were traveling in Ireland this past October, our Irish tour guide told us that Ireland did not have a “gun culture” as we did in the States. Never having heard that opinion expressed before, the term “gun culture” stayed in my head.

After the recent killings at an elementary school in Connecticut, I looked up the word “culture” in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition, which reads in part: the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations; the characteristic features of everyday existence shared by people in a place or time.

Charles M. Blow wrote in A Tragedy of Silence, New York Times, that public opinion is shifting away from gun control. In a recent Gallup poll 53 percent to 43 percent opposed the ban on semiautomic guns or assault rifles.

As I watched…

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GUN CULTURE

It seems fitting to re-post what I wrote last year after 20 children and six teachers were killed at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

Let us not forget.

When we were traveling in Ireland this past October, our Irish tour guide told us that Ireland did not have a “gun culture” as we did in the States. Never having heard that opinion expressed before, the term “gun culture” stayed in my head.

After the recent killings at an elementary school in Connecticut, I looked up the word “culture” in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition, which reads in part: the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations; the characteristic features of everyday existence shared by people in a place or time.

Charles M. Blow wrote in A Tragedy of Silence, New York Times, that public opinion is shifting away from gun control. In a recent Gallup poll 53 percent to 43 percent opposed the ban on semiautomic guns or assault rifles.

As I watched my nine-year-old grandson’s eyes riveted to the front page of Saturday’s New York Times lying on our coffee table, his look of concern told me I needed to speak out in support of gun control. I hope you will, too.

It’s time for a cultural shift.

HAPPY NEW YEAR

 Highlights of 2012

  Watching grandsons growgrandsons

                                   

                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                                                   

                                                                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                                                 Touring France in spring                               Paris

 

Writers Museum

 

 

 

 

Ireland in fall

   

    

anniversary1                             

Celebrating 46 years  

                                                       

                                                                                                                           Perfecting deep-dish Chicago pizzachicago pizza jan. 2012

 

 

 

 

 

Having my story “Invisible” accepted for publication by “the Examined Life Literary Journal.

 

 

I wish you happiness, health and peace in the New Year.

*Two other nurses contributed to this issue of The Examined Life

 

 

 

GUN CULTURE

When we were traveling in Ireland this past October, our Irish tour guide told us that Ireland did not have a “gun culture” as we did in the States. Never having heard that opinion expressed before, the term “gun culture” stayed in my head.

After the recent killings at an elementary school in Connecticut, I looked up the word “culture” in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition, which reads in part: the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations; the characteristic features of everyday existence shared by people in a place or time.

Charles M. Blow wrote in A Tragedy of Silence, New York Times, that public opinion is shifting away from gun control. In a recent Gallup poll 53 percent to 43 percent opposed the ban on semiautomic guns or assault rifles.

As I watched my nine-year-old grandson’s eyes riveted to the front page of Saturday’s New York Times lying on our coffee table, his look of concern told me I needed to speak out in support of gun control. I hope you will, too.

It’s time for a cultural shift.

REIKI REVISITED

A couple of weeks ago, as I followed our tour group, I saw this sign over a storefront on a busy street in Galway. How surprising to see that Reiki was practiced in Ireland.

Well, not so surprising says my friend, fellow nurse practitioner and Reiki Master Teacher, Jane Van De Velde, who tells me “Ireland has a huge Reiki community! I have met Irish practitioners in some of my Reiki travels.”

Check out her latest newsletter.

                                                                                       November 2012
Reiki News, Upcoming Events and Happenings
IN THIS ISSUE
Reiki Clinic at Cancer Center
Make a Gift
Reiki Making a Difference
Reiki for Kids & Teens
  TRSP Calendar of Classes & Events
Find us on Facebook
KEEP UP TO DATE


VISIT OUR WEBSITE
The Reiki Share Project 
MAKE A GIFT
Donation Information
Forward this issue to a Friend
 Dear Marianna

Greetings to all!  It is always time to “get busy” again when autumn arrives. The Reiki Share Project is developing new programs, seeking new venues and spreading the good news about Reiki.  Our work continues!
 Long- Standing Reiki Clinic at Edward Hospital
LInda and Janice
Linda & Janice

In 2004, Linda Conlin, LCSW, was given the task of starting a psychosocial program at the Edward Hospital Cancer Center in Naperville, IL. “My goal was to develop a holistic program that included personal counseling, financial assistance, complementary therapies, networking groups, children’s camp, and educational programs for both patients and families.” Programs include exercise, yoga, meditation, Reiki, and nutrition education. “We had no budget so we have depended on professional volunteers to provide many of these services.”

Linda first learned about Reiki from a co-worker who is a Reiki Master. “Eight years ago, very few people had heard of Reiki. I needed an understanding of what Reiki is and how it could be presented credibly in a health care setting.” Linda was introduced to Reiki Master Teacher Janice Spoelma who agreed to provide her expertise in setting up and supervising the new Reiki Clinic at the Cancer Center. Janice carefully recruited Reiki Master volunteers for this program. “It takes a special person to work with people who have a serious illness such as cancer.” Janice now has approximately 20 Reiki volunteers who offer their services.

For the past eight years, this free clinic has been held once a month during evening hours at the Cancer Center. Patients, caregivers, and staff are welcome to attend and receive 10-minute Reiki sessions. On average, the clinic has 10-12 participants each month. Linda Conlin recalls that “we were one of the very first Reiki clinics in the Chicago area. I had many calls from around the Midwest asking about our program and how we were able to bring Reiki into a healthcare setting.”

This clinic has been well received and supported by medical, nursing, and social work staff. Both Linda and Janice agree that participants “love the Reiki Clinic” and often return bringing friends and family to experience Reiki.   According to Janice, a number of people who are cancer survivors of many years also regularly visit the clinic. “It is so wonderful to see people who are newly diagnosed with cancer interacting with these survivors who are thriving and living their lives.”

Edward Hospital Cancer Center has created its own Reiki community. Says Janice, “the Reiki Clinic has given people the chance to open up and explore other possibilities, other ways to experience relaxation and healing.”

Help Us Share the Gift of Reiki–Make a Gift
Please consider making an “end-of-year” tax-deductible donation toThe Reiki Share Project.  We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in the state of Illinois. Your donation will support our work in making Reiki classes available at little or no cost to people and families who are dealing with serious illness and disability.

Your donation will be gratefully accepted! Thank you!

Average Scores GraphReiki Can Make a Difference
Quality improvement data was recently gathered by Wellness House, a nonprofit organization that provides programs for those with cancer. Participants were asked to rate their stress, pain, & anxiety on a 0-10 scale before and after their Reiki sessions. The survey results are illustrated in the above chart.  It appears that Reiki helped to lower the reported levels of stress, pain, and anxiety for this particular group.
Reiki for Kids & Teens
Kids can learn Reiki too! The Reiki Share Project is in the process of developing Reiki programs for both children and teenagers in cooperation with Wellness House which provides programs for those dealing with cancer. The first program, “Reiki for Families”, will be offered in February, 2013 and will bring children (ages 7-11) and their parents together for a day of learning how to connect with Reiki and share it with each other. This class is for families who have a loved one diagnosed with cancer and who are seeking ways to bring peace and healing into their homes. The second program is for teens whose lives have been touched by cancer.We are interested in hearing from our Reiki readers—do you have experience in teaching Reiki to children or teens? TRSP will keep readers updated on these two new programs!
Thank you for reading our newsletter!  If you have any questions or comments about our work, we would love to hear from you.  Send us an email.  Wishing you many blessings during this season of gratitude!
Sincerely,

Jane

Jane Van De Velde, DNP, RN
Reiki Master Teacher  
President                                            

The Reiki Share Project

Jane@thereikishareproject.org

NURSES REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Betsy, a writer friend, emailed me the story she had read in our workshop since I had to miss the class. She knows I hang on every episode of her life in Ireland where her second child was born and she negotiated the daily vicissitudes of a different culture. In this episode she had left the hospital with her new baby girl. She happily accepted the offer to have a nurse visit her and the baby at home.

Her daughter is in college now but Betsy still remembers how helpful the nurse was—and knowledgeable and reassuring, which, in turn, made me remember the article I read not too long ago by David Bornstein, The Power of Nursing (NYT, May 16, 2012) about nurses who made regular home visits to at-risk pregnant women and continued these visits until their children reached the age of two. The program, Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), conducted studies that demonstrated the visits improved both child and maternal health and financial self-sufficiency and provided a five to seven point boost to the I.Q of these children. Plus many more positive results.

NFP, which has been around since the ‘70s is implemented in forty states, empirically proves what many of us already know: nurses REALLY make a difference. Training paraprofessionals to do the nurses’ job didn’t yield the same outcomes.

We nurses do make a unique contribution. No one else can fill our shoes.

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