Overdue Reckoning on Racism in Nursing

Join me in attending this free series of timely web discussions: Overdue Reckoning on Racism in Nursing.

NurseManifest

We are excited to announce a series of web discussions “Overdue Reckoning on Racism in Nursing” starting on September 12th, and every week through October 10th! This initiative is in part an outgrowth of our 2018 Nursing Activism Think Tank and inspired by recent spotlights on the killing of Black Americans by police, and the inequitable devastation for people of color caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Racism in nursing has persisted far too long, sustained in large part by our collective failure to acknowledge the contributions and experiences of nurses of color. The intention of each session is to bring the voices of BILNOC (Black, Indigenous, Latinx and other Nurses Of Color) to the center, to explore from that center the persistence of racism in nursing, and to inspire/form actions to finally reckon with racism in nursing.

Lucinda Canty, Christina Nyirati and I (Peggy Chinn) have teamed up…

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Top 100 Nursing Blogs Of 2020 That Matter

My Blog, Nursingstories.org, was selected by Nurse Buff: Nursing Humor & Lifestyle Blog as one of the best 100 Nursing Blogs and/or Websites in 2020. While I am honored with this selection, I am also so impressed that we nurses are now publishing our stories on the internet in impressive numbers.

Rather than add an URL I am listing all 100 on my site for your review.

Top 100 Nursing Blogs Of 2020 That Matter

May 10, 2020

 

 

The Nursing Site

Why It Matters: The Nursing Site specializes in posting about the latest topics regarding the nursing profession, boasting a wealth of content available for multiple different audiences such as newly licensed nurses, student nurses, and even seasoned or veteran nurses.

Great Read: “Healthy Eating for Nurses Who Work Long Hours” is a great article for nurses who may be neglecting a healthy diet because of their long work hours or erratic schedules. It also talks about how nurses should also prioritize taking care of themselves in addition to taking care of others.

Nursing from Within with Elizabeth Scala

Why It Matters:  Elizabeth Scala is a nurse who is confident in her knowledge regarding nurse burnout. She is also a Nurse’s Week online program host as well as a bestselling author who often partners with nursing schools and associations in order to help bring about a positive change in the nursing field.

Great Read: “The Physical Benefits of Positive Thinking” talks about how important it is for nurses to think positively and the various tangible benefits that could come as a result of that. Some examples of this are patient pill compliance, appreciative inquiry, and other general physical benefits such as lower stress levels and better cardiovascular health.

Top Nurse Blogs 2019

 

 

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I am grateful to Joost van Beek from NurseRecruiter.com for selecting my blog, NursingStories.org, to be included in the Top Nurse Blogs for 2019, and for including a reference to my memoir: Stories from the Tenth-Floor Clinic: A Nurse Practitioner Remembers.

I am so impressed with how many of my fellow nurses author a blog and the wealth and scope of information contained in these blogs for nurses, other health care providers, caregivers and patients.

NurseRecruiter has grouped the blogs into eight categories:

Thank you to Joost van Beek from NurseRecruiter.com for tackling the monumental task of identifying, categorizing, and summarizing the top nurse blogs.

To connect to NurseRecruiter.com, click here.

 

 

 

Can nurses really speak out too much?

This article caught my attention from the Nursing Times (a monthly magazine for the nurses of the United Kingdom). I had to do some homework to learn about The Queen’s Nursing Institute and its function.

Healthcare policy is a key activity for The Queen’s Nursing Institute. The QNI works to influence decision makers across England, Wales and Northern Ireland on health care policy including primary care, public health, nursing education, regulation and skill mix and issues such as services for homeless people and reducing health inequalities. To do so QNI contributes to stakeholder meetings, responds to national consultations, takes up issues raised by local projects where it appears they may have wider significance, and provides examples and information to policy-makers.  Wikipedia

At the annual conference of the QNI held in London last week, Dame Donna Kinnair, chief executive of the Royal College of Nursing, was told by government representatives that “nurses voices are too loud.”

Read her response below. 

 

 

Let’s Shout Together for Community Nursing

27 SEPTEMBER, 2019 BY  KATHRYN GODFREY 

Nurses at the annual Queen’s Nursing Institute conference held this week in London were told about the government response to hearing the views of nurses.

Dame Donna Kinnair, chief executive of the Royal College of Nursing, told delegates that she had been told by government representatives to bring her membership “under control” so that the voice of nurses would not become “too loud”.

“Nurses do need to speak out about key workforce issues such as safe staffing”

This conversation occurred at a government meeting, but Dame Donna reassured the audience that she would ensure the nursing voice would be heard and in fact “amplified”.

But can nurses ever speak out too much? As a profession they have traditionally been known for getting on with their essential work and not shouting about policy and resource issues. It is therefore good to hear that there is concern that their voices are getting louder.

Nurses do need to speak out about key workforce issues, such as safe staffing as well as more specific issues that affect the patients that they care for. For example, patients who are incontinent are often not provided with adequate supplies of pads to manage their condition. It is big issues like staffing and more specific issues like incontinence resources that affect the care nurses can give and the quality of life patients experience.

Nurses who do speak out can feel like they are speaking in a vacuum and that it is hard to get their message to the decision makers.

Now Dame Donna is asking nurses to share their experiences with her so that she can amplify and communicate to government the concerns of all nurses.

She said: “What I want to do is make sure your voice is amplified through my voice and I can’t do that unless you share your voices and stories with me.

“So that every time I look around, every time I speak to a minister I have got the basics of that conversation, so I am truly representing how nurses feel,” she told attendees.

“This is a crucial time for nurses to raise their voices and have their points heard”

“My pledge to you is that I will continue to amplify your voices and in return I ask you to share your voices and your stories with me, so that we can collectively be a unified profession.”

These are difficult times. We hear little other than Brexit in the news, which means key issues for the health and welfare of the population are being neglected. This is a crucial time for nurses to raise their voices and have their points heard.

The new advertising campaign We are the NHS is timely. The video about nursing is an excellent showcase for the many and varied jobs nurses carry out. It is a great illustration of how highly skilled and essential a workforce nurses are, the glue that holds the NHS together. So the more we hear from them the better. Let’s hope that those who need to listen don’t put their fingers in their ears.

nursing times

I wish our fellow nurses across the pond every success in making their voices heard.

How Mindfulness Can Be an Act of Self-Care for Nurses

I recently came across a new, to me, Blog: Nightingale. A 2017 post by Teresa Brown describes her initial exposure and reservations about mindfulness—I am not giving away the ending. Given I had just spotlighted Julia Sarazine, a qualified mindfulness instructor, I decided to reblog Teresa’s essay.
The Nightingale website looks interesting and promising, however, I didn’t notice any recent activity. Sara Goldberg, founder of Nightingale, may have been busy with her new book: How to be a Patient: The Essential Guide to Navigating the World of Modern Medicine, which was recently released. I read her book and will review it in a future post.

Nightingale

Nurse Burnout Won’t go Away Until the Industry Changes. But in the Meantime, Mindfulness can Help Nurses Prioritize Their Well-Being.

suzy_4

This past November I attended a workshop on nurse burnout at the Johnson Foundation at Wingspread in Racine, Wisconsin. Clinical nurses, administrators, and researchers came together for three days to discuss this pressing issue that is epidemic in nursing. One survey found that almost half of nurses are burned out, meaning they’re so overwhelmed by the job that they’ve lost the capacity to really care about it or their patients.

I tend to be suspicious of talk about mindfulness in health care because it seems to place the onus for change on individuals instead of the overall system.

Several of the workshop presenters discussed “Mindfulness” as a way to alleviate burnout. I tend to be suspicious of talk about mindfulness in health care because it seems to place the onus…

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The National Institutes of Health Disappoints

When I worked at the National Institutes of Health, a colleague and I wrote an article: The Role of Nurse Practitioners Expands at NIH for the NIH Record newsletter in May of 2000 about the increase of Nurse Practitioners at the Institute. My short time there was exciting, especially as I witnessed NP positions increase and opportunities to become involved in research grow. I saw patients in the weekly clinic along with the Fellows, interviewed and examined potential research volunteers, mentored student interns, and participated as a team member in various research studies. And best of all, I had supportive relationships with a cadre of other NPs. I left because my husband accepted a job in North Carolina.

Imagine my shock to learn that the National Institute of Nursing Research chose a dentist to be the interim director. I can’t fathom that there was not a talented, qualified nurse to fill this position. I agree with latest post (below) from The Truth About Nursing that the appointment of a dentist smacks of undermining nursing autonomy and stripping away support for nursing practice. I will write a letter voicing my support of a nurse in this leadership position and disappointment in the poor judgment of the NIH leadership.

Please consider doing the same.

 

 

 

Anyone will do

U.S. nursing research institute appoints dentist as interim director

The National Institute for Nursing Research, which disburses federal grants, announced in August 2019 that its interim director would be…a dentist. And the interim deputy director is a biologist. But non-nurses are non-qualified to evaluate grants for nursing research. These appointments also reinforce the inaccurate stereotype that nurses are unskilled handmaidens, rather than autonomous health professionals. After some of our supporters sent messages asking NIH to rescind the appointments, NIH sent a newsletter proudly announcing the appointments, and then sent emails to our supporters assuring them that it was searching for a nurse to fill the permanent director position. But it did not comment on the interim appointments, so it seems those stand. And filling high-level federal government vacancies can take quite a while. We need your voice on this. Please join us in asking that qualified nurses be chosen for these interim positions! Thank you!

Click here to sign the letter–or write one of your own!

 Change of Pace: Panzanella

The high temperatures that we have in Raleigh keep me indoors more that I would like. The thermometer on my kitchen counter tells me it’s 99 degrees outside as I write this at 4 pm.

Our home is comfortably cool so I could just knuckle down and write my weekly post that is due tomorrow.  However, I am just procrastinating as usual and I can’t think of anything to write about.

I need a change of pace. I love food and, sometimes love cooking, so rather than write about nursing and nursing problems and aging and aging problems and my book, I will post my favorite summer salad recipe, Panzanella.

Panxanella

Panzanella. My Italian grandmother made this salad but I never heard the word Panzanella growing up. Grandma just cut up tomatoes and left-over bread and occasionally served the salad at Sunday family dinners. One course of many.

Panzanella is perfect for hot weather and the best use for tomatoes, which are now plentiful at our farmer’s markets. I like the heirloom German Johnson tomatoes.german johnson tomato

This year, I have a bumper crop of basil in the Earthbox* outside our screened porch. The cucumber and green peppers come from the Earthboxes that my grandson and I planted in his backyard. Every year he chooses what to plant. I am hoping this encourages him to like vegetables but so far it hasn’t. Oh well.

I use a leftover baguette from Yellow Dog bakery. Yellow Dog makes the best baguettes in the area. Get a good quality bread.

yellow dog baguette

For the salad:

1- or 2-day-old crusty baguette, cut into 1-inch cubes, about 5 to 6 cups

1 teaspoon kosher salt

2 large, ripe tomatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 cucumber, unpeeled, seeded, and sliced 1/2-inch thick

2 bell peppers, seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes

1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion

1/2 cup coarsely chopped basil leaves

3 tablespoons capers, drained

For the vinaigrette:

1 tablespoon finely minced garlic

1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons Champagne or red wine vinegar

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

For the vinaigrette, whisk all the ingredients together.

In a large bowl, mix the tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, red onion, basil, and capers. Add the bread cubes and toss with the vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper. Let the salad sit for an hour for the flavors to blend.

This salad will be good the next day or two as the ingredients blend together and the taste becomes richer.

 

*Earthbox is a container gardening system to use when you have limited space and little interest in working a large plot.

New Nursing Show on Netflix


I intend to watch this show. Sounds fascinating.

Reblogged from Truth About Nursing:

Tiempos de AmTor

Netflix show provides limited glimpse of 1920s Spanish wartime nursing, but it does offer one fearless nursing leader

January 2018 – This month Netflix released to the U.S. market the first season of Morocco: Love in Times of War, a 13-episode Spanish drama about nurses setting up a hospital for wounded Spanish soldiers in the North African city of Melilla during the 1920s Rif War. The show, originally titled Tiempos de Guerra, is basically a wartime soap opera. The nurse characters seem more like nursing students, at least for a while, since they have been drawn from upper class Madrid families without much training. There is one big exception:  the Duchess of Victoria, María del Carmen Angoloti y Mesa, a real person played here by Alicia Borrachero. Carmen Angoloti is an expert, all-business force of nature. She doesn’t just train and lead the inexperienced nurses under her. She also fights the military/physician power structure to establish the hospital care systems as she sees fit, arguing for the independence of nursing and not hesitating to go over the military physicians’ heads to her ally the Queen of Spain. Angoloti considers herself to be rightly in charge of the hospital and tells the lead male officer and physician as much. Yet she displays a measure of compassion, avoiding the battle-axe stereotype. So the show offers one pretty great nurse leader, reminiscent of Florence Nightingale in her determination to help wounded soldiers overseas and not let male physicians get in her way. Angoloti’s status in the aristocracy doesn’t hurt her cause, of course. As for the other nurses, they mean well and do seem to learn over time, but they are pretty deferential and overwhelmed. And the show seems more focused on their romances with soldiers and physicians. There is some resemblance to The Crimson Field, the 2014 BBC series about nurses near the front lines in World War I. This Spanish show may have a bit more current resonance: Melilla remains a part of Spain to this day, despite being located on the Moroccan coast, to Morocco’s evident displeasure. And Tiempos de Guerra was supposed to be back for at least one more season, but it doesn’t seem like that ever transpired.

The show was created by Teresa Fernández-Valdés, Ramon Campos, and Gema R. Neira.If you have seen the show, please send your thoughts to Executive Producer Teresa Fernández-Valdés. She can be reached at teresafv@bambuproducciones.com.

Please copy us on your letter at letters@truthaboutnursing.org, so we know what you think. Thank you!

We Agers Are Experts On Our Own Aging Experience

A fellow nurse clued me into Doris Carnevali’s blog. Here is what a Seattle news station, K5News, wrote about her. Her blog follows.

A retired nurse is helping explain what happens when we grow old. Some of it might surprise you.
Author: Ted Land
Published: 7:10 PM PDT June 5, 2019
Updated: 7:25 PM PDT June 5, 2019
SEATTLE — A 97-year-old blogger is helping explain what happens when we grow old. Some of it might surprise you.
Each morning, Doris Carnevali sits at a desk in her West Seattle home and starts writing.
“The ideas are bubbling in my head between the time I’m asleep and awake,” she said.
She has plenty to say about what it’s like to age and she’s sharing it all on her blog, Engaging With Aging.
“Sure, there are times when I am down, and the 14th thing I drop in a day makes me frustrated as all get out. But on the whole, it is so much more exciting than I ever thought it was going to be,” Carnevali said.
She is retired from the UW School of Nursing and has written medical textbooks. Then at the age of 95, she picked up a new hobby: blogging.
“I had been ranting about the fact that I thought aging had gotten a rotten deal. That it was much more pleasant, exciting, and challenging than I had been led to believe,” she said.
After hearing that rant, the dean of the UW School of Nursing urged her to publish her thoughts. So Carnevali’s granddaughter created a blog account and the words flowed.
Today, she’s written dozens of passages on what she calls age-related changes.
“My hands don’t pick up things the way I used to, do I say I’m losing my hands? No, I’m changing how I use them and that way I don’t get down in the dumps,” Carnevali said.
Engaging With Aging isn’t a how-to advice blog. It’s more of a diary about what she’s going through. If her readers extract lessons, great. If not, the exercise keeps Carnevali sharp.
“I’m still growing, I’m green, I’m inept, I’m clumsy, I’m learning every day, but I’m green, and I’m growing,” she said. “I thought of aging as being grey, no, it’s green.”
She does not shy away from the fact that there will come a day when her hobby is no longer possible.
“When it happens, it happens, and it would be nice if it didn’t, but I’m too busy doing other things to worry about it right now,” she said.

Engaging With Aging

With that expertise come responsibilities

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Many of the people who study old people, theorize and write about us, take care of us, or relate to us are not “old’ themselves. They experience old age second handedly. Earlier in my life as a nurse I often had older patients. As a daughter I shared my parents’ aging. In my 50’s I blithely participated in three editions of a nursing book about caring for the elderly without taking note of myself as the “outsider.”

Now I feel as If I had been a pilot flying over the city of aging, assuming I knew how the residents lived. What an illusion!   It’s not that what I knew, used or wrote about elderly people was inaccurate. But it paid only narrow attention to the significant ways normal aging was changing agers’ capacities to manage their ever-present tasks and relationships. I had looked at them…

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