Beans

I don’t make New Year resolutions anymore. I have given up losing and gaining the same ten pounds over and over my whole adult life. However, I do want to eat more healthy: less red meat, more veggies, omit sugar, and reduce my reliance on processed food.

In an effort to meet my goals, I am expanding my cooking repertoire. Melissa Clark who writes for the New York Times has tips for eating less meat. Her first suggestion is to eat more beans and the second is to use high protein grains, and, she adds that pasta counts. Who doesn’t love giving pasta a thumbs up!

I made her Indian Butter Chickpea recipe the other day. If you’re interested, try making it. It’s easy and the ingredients are not exotic. See below.

 

Note: Melissa Clark writes beautifully about her interface with food. I always enjoy her columns in the NYTs.

 

Happy New Year and healthy eating!

 

David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

EASY

Indian Butter Chickpeas

MELISSA CLARK

  • YIELD 4 to 6 servings
  • TIME 1 hour 10 minutes

 

A vegetarian riff on Indian butter chicken, this fragrant stew is spiced with cinnamon, garam masala and fresh ginger, and is rich and creamy from the coconut milk. You could add cubed tofu here for a soft textural contrast, or cubed seitan for a chewy one. Or serve it as it is, over rice to catch every last drop of the glorious sauce. You won’t want to leave any behind.

Featured in: The Meat Lover’s Guide To Eating Less Meat.
Indian
BeansCurriesButterChickpeaCoconut MilkGaram MasalaGarlicGingerTomatoEasyWeekdayMain CourseVegetarian

INGREDIENTS

  • 4tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1large onion, minced
  • 1 ½teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 4garlic cloves, finely grated or minced
  • 1tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2teaspoons sweet paprika
  • 2teaspoons garam masala
  • 1small cinnamon stick
  • 1(28-ounce) can whole peeled plum tomatoes
  • 1(15-ounce) can coconut milk
  • 2(15-ounce) cans chickpeas, drained
  • Ground cayenne (optional)
  • Cooked white rice, for serving
  • ½cup cilantro leaves and tender stems, for serving

PREPARATION

  1. Melt butter in a large heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Stir in onion and 1/2 teaspoon salt; cook until golden and browned around the edges, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes. (Don’t be tempted to turn the heat up to medium-high; keeping the heat on medium ensures even browning without burning the butter.)

  2. Stir in garlic and ginger and cook another 1 minute. Stir in cumin, paprika, garam masala and cinnamon stick, and cook another 30 seconds.

  3. Add tomatoes with their juices. Using a large spoon or flat spatula, break up and smash the tomatoes in the pot (or you can use a pair of kitchen shears to cut the tomatoes while they are still in the can). Stir in coconut milk and the remaining 1 teaspoon salt. Bring to a simmer, and continue to cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, and continuing to mash up the tomatoes if necessary, to help them break down.

  4. Stir in chickpeas and a pinch of cayenne if you like. Bring the pot back up to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, for another 10 minutes. Taste and add more salt if necessary.

  5. Serve spooned over white rice and topped with cilantro.

Happy New Year 2020

Frieda Paton, RN, a writer for Nurseslabs, an education and nursing lifestyle website geared towards helping student nurses and registered nurses with information for the betterment of their nursing careers, wrote the following in June, 2019:

WHO Confirms 2020 as International Year of Nurse and Midwife

Governments from around the world endorsed 2020 as the Year of the Nurse and Midwife during the World Health Assembly. The global celebration is in recognition of the indispensable role of nurses and midwives in bringing health care to people everywhere.

Spotlight on the role of nurses and midwives

In January this year, the Executive Committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed that 2020 be designated as the Year of the Nurse and Midwife because of the vital contribution of nurses and midwives towards achieving universal health coverage. 2020 is also the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale.

Member states endorsed the proposal during the 72nd World Health Assembly on May 24. This is the world’s most crucial decision making a body for health policy.

‘WHO is proud to nominate 2020 as the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife. These two health professions are invaluable to the health of people everywhere.” said Dr. Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director General of the WHO. ‘While WHO recognizes their crucial role on a daily basis, 2020 will be dedicated to highlighting the enormous sacrifices and contributions of nurses and midwives, and to ensuring that we address the shortage of these vital professions.”

Nursing Organization’s reaction

The idea of 2020 as Year of the Nurse and Midwife was initially suggested by the global, three-year Nursing Now campaign, which runs until 2020 in collaboration with the ICN and WHO. Lord Nigel Crisp, Co-Chair of the campaign, emphasized that rapid and cost-effective improvement in universal health care could be achieved by investing in nursing and midwifery.

“This is a once in a generation opportunity for governments to really show nurses and midwives how much they are valued,” commented Crisp. “Not by empty words, but by effective, decisive action to give us the human and physical resources needed to get the job done.”

Annette Kennedy, President of the International Council of Nurses, commended Ghebreyesus for supporting the idea of highlighting nurses’ contribution to healthcare and thanked the members of the WHA for endorsing this vision.

Florence Nightingale used her lamp to illuminate the places where nurses worked,” said Kennedy. “I hope the designation of 2020 as the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife will provide us with a new, 20-20 vision of what nursing is in the modern era, and how nurses can light the way to universal health coverage and healthcare for all.”

Every nurse can play their part

Within their individual circle of influence every nurse, across the world, can help to place the spotlight on their profession.

We will need to seize the opportunity of the Year of the Nurse and Midwife to communicate to decision-makers and the public alike who exactly we are and the vital contribution we make to society in the modern world.

 

72-World-Health-Assembly
World Health Assembly

 

Now it is up to us nurses to make the most of The Year of the Nurse and Midwife. From the American Nurses Association: “Nurses are encouraged to use #yearofthenurse and follow us on social media as we celebrate nurses in 2020. To stay connected throughout the year and join the celebration, click here.”

 

 

 

Persistence and Determination

I look back on 2018 with wonder and gratitude. My book is finally published. I feel such a sense of accomplishment. I don’t credit this achievement to talent, genius or education as you can see from my most favorite quote below:

Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.

Calvin Coolidge

Up until the of the end of November, I worked with Caitlin Hamilton, my publicist, who promoted my book through book signings, guest posts on writers’ blogs, testimonials, interviews by correspondents of newspapers, etc. Now the job of gaining visibility for my book is up to me.

In 2019, as I learn more about marketing a book than I care to know, I will also begin writing my next book about my nursing experiences.

I wish you a happy, healthy and peaceful New Year and the persistence and determination to reach your goals.

 

 

Letting Go of the Life We Plan

“We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us.”
― Joseph Campbell

I didn’t plan to write a book but that’s what happened. I had always wanted to be a writer and, even as I worked as a Nurse Practitioner, I took writing classes, went to workshops and kept a journal documenting patient stories that one day I would expand and publish. But writing a book was never on my agenda.

I like to think I followed Joseph Campbell’s advice and stayed open to the many possibilities that came my way. And I may have, but not intentionally.

I am pleasantly surprised to find myself a soon-to-be published author.

With the New Year almost here, I reflect on the serendipitous events that supported my literary efforts, including meeting other writers that inspired and encouraged me, finding supporting mentors and willing beta readers.

Somehow what I needed at the time found me.

In 2018, as I journey along the publishing road, I plan to stay open to all the new adventures awaiting me.

Thanks to all of you who follow my Blog.

I wish you happiness, health and contentment in the New Year.