Lois Roelofs posted this story of Martha Keochareon, a nurse dying of pancreatic cancer who selflessly allowed nursing students to be present during her last days at home in order to learn about hospice care.
I hope this poignant story moves you as much as it did me.

Write Along with Me

As she lay dying from pancreatic cancer, Nurse Martha Keochareon wanted to do more than plan her funeral. So she called her alma mater and offered to become a “case study” for nursing students. She reasoned she could help students learn about the dying process while, at the same time, it would be a way for her “to squeeze one more chapter out of life.”

I loved this story. First, as a retired nurse educator, I was struck by Nurse Keochareon’s selfless giving. I could identify with her desire to teach; as nurses we are taught, along with being caregivers, to be teachers (as well as communicators, researchers, leaders and more). I believe we consider it a duty and a privilege to empower our patients or students with the resources they need to function successfully in their lives.

Second, Nurse Keochareon had lived with pancreatic cancer for more than six…

View original post 191 more words

5 thoughts on “

  1. michelemurdock says:

    Thank you for this touching story I admire the woman for using her last bit of energy to share this experience. What a great idea she had right to the end. inspiring I think.

    Like

  2. Noreen Depies Ordronneau says:

    Thanks for sharing. As a 1968 graduate from Mercy Hospital in San Diego, I recall a patient of mine who was having a parasentesis for pancreatic ascedies. I was a new grad and after getting everything ready for the doctor I stood by her and held her hand. She was so grateful for my support that she gave me a little pin with a stone on the end a few days later. I was just as important to her as the doctor. I learned how important it is that nurses take care of the mind, body and soul in all circumstances. We did multitask and care for all patients every second. Emphasis is a little bit different today.
    Noreen Depies Ordronneau

    Like

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