A Nurse Tells it Like it Is

A nurse has called attention to our dysfunctional health care system in the OP-ED section of the New York Times. (Our Jury-Rigged Health Care System by Teresa Brown, New York Times, September 6, 2019) Brown has hit a nerve as evidenced by the 969 comments to date supporting her stance. Her article discusses how nurses (and … Continue reading A Nurse Tells it Like it Is

How Mindfulness Can Be an Act of Self-Care for Nurses

I recently came across a new, to me, Blog: Nightingale. A 2017 post by Teresa Brown describes her initial exposure and reservations about mindfulness—I am not giving away the ending. Given I had just spotlighted Julia Sarazine, a qualified mindfulness instructor, I decided to reblog Teresa’s essay.
The Nightingale website looks interesting and promising, however, I didn’t notice any recent activity. Sara Goldberg, founder of Nightingale, may have been busy with her new book: How to be a Patient: The Essential Guide to Navigating the World of Modern Medicine, which was recently released. I read her book and will review it in a future post.

Nightingale

Nurse Burnout Won’t go Away Until the Industry Changes. But in the Meantime, Mindfulness can Help Nurses Prioritize Their Well-Being.

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This past November I attended a workshop on nurse burnout at the Johnson Foundation at Wingspread in Racine, Wisconsin. Clinical nurses, administrators, and researchers came together for three days to discuss this pressing issue that is epidemic in nursing. One survey found that almost half of nurses are burned out, meaning they’re so overwhelmed by the job that they’ve lost the capacity to really care about it or their patients.

I tend to be suspicious of talk about mindfulness in health care because it seems to place the onus for change on individuals instead of the overall system.

Several of the workshop presenters discussed “Mindfulness” as a way to alleviate burnout. I tend to be suspicious of talk about mindfulness in health care because it seems to place the onus…

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The National Institutes of Health Disappoints

When I worked at the National Institutes of Health, a colleague and I wrote an article: The Role of Nurse Practitioners Expands at NIH for the NIH Record newsletter in May of 2000 about the increase of Nurse Practitioners at the Institute. My short time there was exciting, especially as I witnessed NP positions increase … Continue reading The National Institutes of Health Disappoints

Mindfulness: Julia Sarazine

I met Julia Sarazine this past June when I spoke to Rush University nurses in Chicago about my book: Stories from the Tenth-Floor Clinic: A Nurse Practitioner Remembers. We agreed on the need for nurses to tell their stories. When I discovered Julia’s background in teaching mindfulness techniques to nurses in order to reduce symptoms … Continue reading Mindfulness: Julia Sarazine

Home Visits Can Be Fraught with Danger

  One time, long ago, at a nursing conference, I sat fixated as a fellow nurse told a story about the time she rang the doorbell at her patient’s house, and he didn’t answer. It was later that she found out he had been murdered. And in hearing more detail, she discovered that the murderer … Continue reading Home Visits Can Be Fraught with Danger

Wishes, Dreams and Hopes for My Book: Stories from the Tenth-Floor Clinic

  I imagine Oprah Winfrey being told by one of her many assistants about a book she should read that is set in Chicago, that focuses on a female protagonist and deals with the disenfranchised on the West Side. Oprah, immediately after reading my book, writes a glowing review in O, the Oprah magazine. Great … Continue reading Wishes, Dreams and Hopes for My Book: Stories from the Tenth-Floor Clinic

New Nursing Show on Netflix

I intend to watch this show. Sounds fascinating. Reblogged from Truth About Nursing: Tiempos de AmTor Netflix show provides limited glimpse of 1920s Spanish wartime nursing, but it does offer one fearless nursing leader January 2018 – This month Netflix released to the U.S. market the first season of Morocco: Love in Times of War, a … Continue reading New Nursing Show on Netflix

Getting Older

In keeping with the theme of my last two posts, this one reflects my ambivalence about aging.

Nursing Stories

I promptly lost my first Medicare card. When I opened the envelope and saw the red, white and blue border, I was reminded of the elderly I cared for over twenty years ago when I was a gerontological nurse practitioner. I ran a not-for-profit clinic in a converted one-bedroom apartment on the tenth floor of a senior citizen highrise in Chicago. How many times had I asked to see someone’s Medicare card? Most of my patients were poor, illiterate and had multiple health problems. So when I first looked at my card, I could only remember loneliness, despair and disability. This couldn’t be happening to me. And, poof, the card was gone.

Slowly other patients strolled into my memory. Mildred, blind and lived alone, always asked me to put her kitchen cabinets back in order after her daughter visited. Margie, ninety-something with an Irish brogue, came down to the clinic…

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